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Zwarte Silo

About a week ago I visited the Havenkwartier. The 'black silo' (zwarte silo) was open to the public so I was able to take a few snapshots inside. It still has a beautiful and industrial atmosphere even though it's quite empty now.

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HKLOS

Today almost everyone working in the 'Havenkwartier' (the harbor area that houses a lot of creative companies, artists etc. in Deventer) opened their doors to the public.

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Vandaag was HKLOS- oftewel, (bijna) alles en iedereen in het Havenkwartier had z'n deuren open. Een mix van open ateliers, de achtbaan ervaren middels een 3D-bril, muziek, wijn proeven van La Bottega in de Bella Macchina garage, een Space Cowboys barbecue, DAVO bier, snuffelen in de kringloopwinkel, de Lucy Cube van binnen bekijken, workshops volgen, informatie over zelf bouwen in het Havenkwartier opvragen, de smid aan het werk zien en de smalle trapjes van de Zwarte Silo beklimmen.
Voor de kinderen was er de beste (onbedoelde) zandbak ooit.  

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Drents Museum

When I visited the Drents Museum I was expecting to see the new wing (and take a few pictures of it, of course). Unfortunately they were still working on the new exhibition at the time, so I had to be content with looking at a small part of the new wing and visiting the old part of the museum.

The old wing is definitely very beautiful as well. I'll go back for the new wing later this year.

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Abel

A little while ago we went to Assen. We parked near this building (apparently it's called the Abel Tasman toren- toren means tower). I have a soft spot for huge, sober/ minimalistic structures so it immediately caught my attention.

So far I've been able to find out it was built in 1977 and it was the tallest building in Assen for a while, until the Regiopolitie Drenthe building surpassed it apparently. Unfortunately I have no idea who the original architect was. (if anyone does, feel free to leave me a note)

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Museum Küppersmühle, Duisburg

A while ago we visited Museum Küppersmühle in Duisburg (Germany). Art works like 'Traum des Künstlers' by Markus Lüpertz and the 'Sternenlager' works by Anselm Kiefer were definitely worth the visit, as was the building itself with the modern architectural addition by Herzog & De Meuron.

The main entrance and the staircase from the outside.

I took a few pictures of the spectacular staircase from the inside as well.

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To be honest, it's not enough to look at the pictures (then again- is it ever?). This is one of those interiors you'll want to experience yourself- you just have to see and feel the material that was used up close and personal.

The area itself, the inland port, is beautiful as well. We'll definitely want to visit there again.

Lucy Cube

On friday january 31st I attended the opening of the 'Lucy Cube', a hotel room placed on top of an old industrial structure in the Havenkwartier (the port area) in Deventer. It will be open for guests soon.
For more info, check Lucy's facebook page. (texts are in Dutch)

Afgelopen vrijdag 31 januari was de officiële opening van de 'Lucy Cube', een hotelkamer naar ontwerp van kunstenaar Rob Sweer en architecten MuldersvandenBerk. De Lucy Cube staat bovenop de vultrechter in het Havenkwartier in Deventer; een geweldige plek voor een bijzondere overnachting met mooi uitzicht.

De Space Cowboys zorgden voor de (broodnodige) warme vuurtjes (het leek wel winter, zo koud), er gingen heel wat broodjes met zuurkool en worst rond en er werd gesproken door o.a. Guido de Vries, voormalig wethouder Marc-Jan Ahne, wethouder Robin Hartog Heys en de eerste hotelkamergast.

Helaas was het pikdonker toen de sneak preview binnenin de Cube plaatsvond maar ik hoop op een nieuwe kans bij daglicht, met camera- binnenkort.

Meer info op Lucy's facebook pagina.

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over there

I visited a friend in The Hague and decided I'd take the 14mm (21mm at 35mm or 'full frame') out for a street photography test drive. It's pretty wide and because of my usual architectural work I can't stomach the look of 'keystoned buildings', so I thought it was going to be a bit of a challenge for me, trying to keep both the actual street scene and the background in balance in my shots. It worked out well though. The building in the first shot isn't perfectly straight, but it's not making me seasick either- and of course, it's not the subject of the photo.

If I had shot the second one with a standard lens like a 50mm, I wouldn't have been able to show so much of the man's environment, which was what draw me in in the first place.

So for now I have to conclude, I actually like this 14mm for street shots.  Who would have thought?

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X-E1 + 14mm

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When I bought the Fuji X100, I had finally found my all-round camera- a camera with 'analog' controls, beautiful output and not too much nonsense. The only downside-for me- was the fixed lens. Don't get me wrong, I love primes, and a 35mm lens is great. I'd rather go out and about with just one prime than with multiple primes (or a zoom lens). Keeps things simple. Still, I love a bit of wide-angle.

So, in comes the X-E1. Basically an X100 with the option to switch lenses. (if you're into the geek stuff you probably already know the other differences and what the X-Pro is etc. and if not you can always look it up, but I won't bore you with the exact details- I think this is one of those cameras too many people have written about already anyway, so I'll keep it simple and personal) 

I decided to wait a little- it's not like I don't have enough cameras to work with- so I could think it through and be sure this was what I 'needed'. Yes, those quote marks.. I mean, seriously, how much do I need another camera? Will it add anything? Will it help me, or will it just be another choice whenever I go out or when I start working on a project? Is it something I think I need just because it's such an amazing little gadget?

I decided I did 'need' this camera after all, because it would give me something I didn't have- but really wanted; a very nice wide angle prime lens (21mm) on a very good little camera; a camera I wouldn't mind lugging around all the time. Which, unfortunately, I can't say about my dslr. I never take it with me anymore. It's too heavy, it attracts too much (and the wrong kind of) attention and I don't love that dslr, I never really did. It's a tool, and whenever I have architecture/ interior jobs it's the right tool. For everything else it really doesn't suit me.

So I sold my 16-35mm, a lens I hardly ever used and kept around 'as a backup, just in case'. It turns out, when I had to bring in my shift lens for repairs I considered renting that same shift lens for a job I had, but I NEVER considered using the 16-35 for it. Then I bought the 14mm (=21mm) lens with the X-E1, and did a quick interior shot to see how well it really performed. I mean, you can read every review out there and conclude it has hardly any distortion and should be almost perfect, but seeing it for yourself is kind of a different thing. Besides, I'm a bit picky.

I cropped a tiny bit off the interior shot (up, left), but didn't do any perspective adjustments or straightening. Same goes for the second shot- I was trying to get a nice shot of the pump when my cat decided she had to see what was going on, so excuse the cat. Cropped off the top there.

I'm rather happy to be honest. It won't- ever- replace my shift lens, but the quality is amazing. I'm looking forward to using that 14mm a lot, everywhere- unlike the 16-35.

(The photos in the two previous blogs were both shot with the 14mm as well) 

noorderlicht

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A yearly tradition: visiting Noorderlicht, the Dutch photo exhibition in either Groningen or Friesland. This year the exhibition took place in the old Suikerfabriek (sugar factory) in Groningen, a beautiful place (but rather cold, so learn from my mistake and don't leave your coat in the car just because it's nice and warm outside). The exhibition on the first floor, 'To have and have not' had the most impressive works. For me, Kadir van Loohuizen, Christian Kryl, Francisco Reina, Xiaoxiao Xu, and Kennardphilipps stood out most.

 

stedelijk

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We visited the Stedelijk Museum (Amsterdam) today. I was particularly impressed with Kudo Tetsumi's work ('Cultivation by Radio-activity in the Electronic Circuit'), Yayoi Kusama's boat sculpture ('Aggregation') and with the sound installation in this staircase- which you really need to go and experience for yourself, so I'm only showing you a picture of the staircase.

~I have to admit- I don't remember the name of the artist, if it was in fact stated anywhere. I found two different blogs attributing it to two different artists, so I decided not to add to the confusion as well.